September 10, 2018

Project-Program Management (PPM) Insights that matter

Below is highlights of a few topics conversed by a group of senior technical and professional PPM leaders gathered together at September meeting of PMI-Silicon Valley chapter.

Meeting Notes:

  • What are new trends and tools in program management:
    There are various (new) trends and tools on how we manage our projects; like using various techniques of Scrum daily stand-ups and retrospectives, creating a hybrid method of team management, etc. We do not want to use strict methods to follow a given framework (like Scrum)! There are many changes in work places and we ought to adapt to working in a cross functional team! Communication becomes important as in any-size team most changes require adaption (and diversion from set PM methods). Larger organizations use more structured approach, though. Project management requires organizational and leadership skills. Let us not forget that in many cases hybrid of different frameworks and methods may work better for a given professional environment. In general a PM’s job is to make sure “the job is done” regardless of what method or approach we use. At this juncture, an experienced PM would look at all possibilities that help the team to accomplish tasks in-hand effectively. Various tools are being constantly created or enhanced to help PMs to work smarter so their team and organization stay atop of their competitions. As an important skill of any PM, we emphasize on communication skills, especially with respect to multi-cultural / multi-lingual communication. Adding challenges of remote team / virtual teams affect interaction among our team members and milestone we create.

    What do you think about new trends and tools helping Program Managers?
    Please comment and engage in our conversation.

  • How to maintain Three-Letter Acronyms (TLA) related to PM topics?
    Even though we have used quite a few acronyms in the first 15-minutes of our today meeting, when looking for definition of any given acronyms list (on the Net), we sometimes get competing definition for a given 3-letter acronym! Even sometimes a given acronym may have different meaning to several people! Making it more complex is how the real meaning of a specific acronym may change when translated from English to another language! There are many examples like Infra; meaning “below” or “further on” in English, it means Infrastructure in IT world, infrared, supra vs. infra, etc.

    Would you add your comments on how to keep an active list of TLA?
    Please comment and engage in our conversation.

  • What are hot area in management, and leadership?
    What we see these days for instance on job descriptions is “soft skills” and “communications” because in many cased team works stumble because members cannot communicate and the PM or leadership cannot get them all rolling on the planned direction! Even though some technical members (i.e. engineers) hesitate when they hear words like teams, stay on track, project manager, Agile, etc.

    Please comment and engage in our conversation regarding hot area in management and leadership.

  • Regarding strategies for Project-Program Managers in transition, we are referred to attend Job Seekers’ Breakfast Meeting of PMI Silicon Valley chapter.
  • I also invite you to attend our next dynamic discussions regarding PMO challenges and best practices.

Please add your remarks, or post your questions and engage with our PPM community. I also would like to invite you to engage with us at our next meeting. Please check out PMI Silicon Valley chapter events for more information. You may also contact www.SVProjectManagement.com team to post your topic of interest.

April 17, 2014

Career Development continues!

Category: Online Marketing — David @ 1:25 pm

Career development is a continuous process in our today’s era. For its sensitive nature, one of our senior managers had a successful “Career Management Seminar” workshop at PMI - Silicon Valley chapter. At our last breakfast meeting, our participating members exchanged thought provoking ideas based on a workshop presented by Dan Levin regarding the topic and related Behavioral Styles. Below are a few facts that I have extracted from our dialogue.

Most participants of Dan’s workshop were experienced project and program managers. However, at times there are some managers who employ just a few tactics of “structured management” rather than emphasizing on clear project development and management plans! It is not a surprise that majority of managers do not have adequate management training.

A careful career management plan would follow the same skills and techniques that projects and programs management would employ! Managing our career is much like developing a business plan with clear definition of where we want to head, and how we want to grow in our career. This is much like writing our resume based on what we want to do and not what we have done! Our experience is useful because of lessons we have learned to improve our next job.

Let’s not forget that our boss needs to know what we’re doing; what white space, grey space, good work, and other tasks we conduct, and how many different hats we’re wearing. Getting feedback from immediate supervisors as what would be a better approach for more positive impact on the task(s) may help the supervisor to support our next promotion! However, we shall also look for, and go after opportunities in the organization as most promotions are based on more responsibilities rather than routine performance!

One useful tactic is finding a mentor who is a couple of levels higher in the organization. Learning how the mentor operates and handles different projects, tasks, stakeholders, and communication with other executives will help us to ascend in our careers. Have you ever tried providing any presentation to a crowd? How is your presentation style? Providing different pitches to senior managers and executives is like an art that can be perfected through experience (or repetition as well!?)

Project and program management is like “Politics” as senior managers shall satisfy all their stakeholders. It is a good practice to search for, and learn about strategic behavioral management skills. Tactical approaches of senior managers and executives regarding sensitive issues would help to polish stakeholder management skills. Delicate control of complex environment and issues require knowing how the “behavioral management” is set or followed, and what the best practices of strategic leadership shall be!

Disclaimer: This is an extracts from PMI-Silicon Valley Chapter’s group meetings held regularly in Mountain View, California. Many thanks to our active members:

Dan Levin, Kevin Thompson, Anup Deshpande, Mathew Thankachan, T. Mallie BrathwaiteCarl Angotti, Matthew Hebb, Cynthia Lau, and David Bakhtnia

April 15, 2013

First Note on Management

Category: Management — admin @ 1:11 pm

This is my first writing about management (project, program, product, people, etc.)
Hopefully other professional friends, colleagues, and viewers will participate in a dynamic exchange of ideas regarding management issues.

I would like to start with a note from Michel Thiry’s presentation at PMI; The Future of PM in a Digital Economy. ( Members of PMI can log-in and listen to the recorded version.

With the expansion of digital technology that affects everyone’s daily life, and while the global economy is shifting and business context becoming complex and turbulent, how can we adapt our business procedures and projects progresses in this fast-paste digitized environment? Especially a micro business like my business, I need to proactively connect my project and program management, and product development processes to global digital technology, bringing my talents to my business partners’ table! These are translated into connecting the enterprise products demands to fast-growth talents (by younger economies*) who want a share of the prosperity as well. I am trying to use any possible means to connect different stakeholders of “A” project in my hand together; so that we all can respond to any change as fast as possible so that the project can produce based on its milestones – on time and within projected budget.

* BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) and other young and fast-growing digital minds (Singapore, Malaysia, Middle-easterners, Mexico, etc.)